Monthly Archives: September 2015

Next AQUA conference: “Quaternary in the City of Sails”, Auckland, NZ, 5-9 December 2016

The next AQUA biennial conference will be held in Auckland New Zealand, from the 5-9 December 2016!

Auckland

Topic sessions will be held on the 5-6 & 8-9 December, with calls for session themes and registration details to be sent out in February 2016.

At this stage, two mid-conference field trips will be held on the 7th December, with options to head to the buried OIS7 forest on the tidal flats and temperate rainforest walk or Rangitoto shield volcano excursion and Motutapu Island in the Hauraki Gulf.

A Conference dinner will be held on the 8th December (venue being discussed), with a Quiz nite and BBQ on the 9th December.

Two post conference field trip options (6 days each) are currently being planned, and will be run according to level of interest.

The post conference field trips would depart Auckland 10 December and end 15 December 2016.

Trip 1: The Quaternary of the winterless North (a loop around the sub-tropical Northland/Far North region starting and ending in Auckland; Three nights in Bay of Islands, two nights at Kai Iwi Lakes). The trip will focus on ancient kauri, changes in ecology as seen in pollen records over interglacial-glacial scales, and coastal barrier evolution from OIS5-present.

Trip 2: Quaternary volcanism and environmental change

(excursion south from Auckland through the Waikato, the central North Island and ending in Wellington; Three nights in Taupo, two nights in Palmerston North). There will be a focus on Quaternary volcanism, tectonism, sedimentation, and climate. Stops will include the Taupo and Rotorua volcanic centres, glaciation in the Tongariro National Park, Napier/Hawkes Bay and the Kapiti- Horowhenua / Wanganui Basin sequences.

A PDF flyer is available here to begin advertising within your organisations. More information will be published on the AQUA website and Facebook as it becomes available.

Travel grants available for Australian and New Zealand ECR Geoscientists

The Academy, together with the Australian Geoscience Council, has opened a call for applications for a travel grant scheme for Australian and New Zealand ECR Geoscientists. This is a new fund that offers annual grants of up to $5000 for career-enhancing travel, established with the proceeds of the 2012 Brisbane IGC.

For conditions and criteria head to the Australian Geoscience Council Website.

Applications close on 31 October 2015 for travel beginning in 2016.

The advent of the Anthropocene in Australasia

We’d love your opinion on this article!! Please head to https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/LTZ5HPP and choose your preferred definition of “The Anthropocene”.
If you choose the option of “other” then please email president@aqua.org.au with your other.Votes close at the end of September.
 
First published in Quaternary Australasia, July 2015. – PDF version
Helen C. Bostock1, David J. Lowe2, Richard Gillespie3, Rebecca Priestley4, Rewi M. Newnham5, Scott D. Mooney6
 

Introduction

As early as the late 19th Century, several scientists had suggested that humans were starting to influence the physical environment of planet Earth (e.g. Marsh, 1864; Stoppani, 1873; Arrhenius, 1896; Chamberlain, 1897). This idea was resurrected and expanded in 2000 by Paul Crutzen, a Nobel Prize-winning chemist, and the late Eugene Stoermer, a professor of biology specialising in diatoms, who suggested that we had left the Holocene and entered the “Anthropocene” (Crutzen and Stoermer, 2000). As summarised by Steffen et al. (2011) and Wolfe et al. (2013), these iconoclastic scientists were referring to the Anthropocene as the interval of demonstrable human alteration of global biogeochemical cycles, beginning subtly in the late 18th Century following James Watt’s invention of the coal-fired steam engine, and accelerating markedly in the mid-20th Century (termed “The Great Acceleration”). Thus Crutzen and Stoermer (2000) argued that the Anthropocene should be an epoch, and for a starting date at the beginning of the Industrial Revolution (Monastersky, 2015).

The term Anthropocene is now regularly used in the geological/environmental literature, appearing in nearly 200 peer-reviewed articles in 2012, and three new journals have been launched over the last few years specifically focussed on this topic, namely The Anthropocene Review, Anthropocene, and Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene. In 2014, the Geological Society, London, published A Stratigraphical Basis for the Anthropocene (Waters et al., 2014), a 321-page volume devoted to the subject. The problem is that the Anthropocene has not yet been formally defined and different disciplines (and even scientists within the same discipline) have different viewpoints as to when the Anthropocene began, if at all (Table 1). In addition, most perspectives on this issue are derived from the Northern Hemisphere, although Brown et al. (2013) and Ellis et al. (2013) and some others have taken a more global viewpoint. Continue reading

AQUA t-shirts for sale!

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Super stylish AQUA t-shirts are now available to purchase!

T-shirts are light blue and feature an AQUA logo on the front, and a quaternary-inspired design by Emily Field on the back.

T-shirts are only $39, including postage within Australia and New Zealand!

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Currently, we only have sizes L, XL, and 2XL available, however smaller sizes will be available to purchase soon.

 

If you would like to order a t-shirt, or would like to put in a request for a smaller size, please contact Scott Mooney (s.mooney@unsw.edu.au) to double check sizing availability. You will then be given AQUA’s bank details to pay via direct deposit.